Kena: Bridge of Spirits – Rot Location Guides

Kena: Bridge of Spirits - Rot Locations Part One

If there’s one thing I do when I play a game (besides trying to relax and enjoy myself), it’s look up information. I get curious or stuck, and I find myself turning to the internet for answers. There are a lot of good guides out there that are super helpful, but what I don’t see are an abundance of simple and clean visual guides that lay out all the information in one place.

I’ve finished playing Kena: Bridge of Spirits and I loved it! It has quickly become one of my favorite games and I can’t wait to see what Ember Labs brings us in the future!

If you want to find all 100 Rots in the game, I’ve created these guides to help you find them! These visual or infographic guides are separated into two parts to keep the document size smaller. The Rots are organized by their numbers to show the quantity in each area of the map (assigned numbers may vary slightly dependent on what order you collect them), followed by detailed descriptions of where to find them. 

Please let me know if you would like me to work on a guide for the other collectibles within Kena: Bridge of Spirits or if there are any games you would like to see visual information or guides for in the future! I love helping people, discussing games and organizing information!

Kena: Bridge of Spirits - Rot Locations Part Two

Let’s Bring Positivity Back into Gaming

I am a positive gamer and this is a safe space for us all to express our love for games without negativity!

I play games to enjoy and relax. I lose myself in whatever a particular game has to offer, whether that be the plot, the characters, the creativity, the graphics; I appreciate all video games and their creators. If a game does not pique my own personal interests, I don’t attack it, I move on to one that does.

If it’s necessary to review a game, I provide constructive feedback and information, supported by specific examples to help improvement. This feedback should always be offered in a friendly manner with good intentions and that’s exactly what I do! 

Reviewing games is useful, but one of my favorite things to do is create unconventional guides for the games I enjoy! I’ve created guides for the animal locations in Okami, the stray bead locations in Okami, the alchemy recipes in Ni No Kuni, and more! I love helping people find what they’re looking for and I intend to make more guides this year so stay tuned!

Are you a positive gamer? Please introduce yourself, I would love to hear from you! What’s your favorite game?

Link’s Item Guide – The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past

Link's Items Guide

If there’s one thing I do when I play a game (besides trying to relax and enjoy myself), it’s look up information. I get curious or stuck, and I find myself turning to the internet for answers. There are a lot of good guides out there that are super helpful, but what I don’t see are an abundance of simple and clean visual guides that lay out all the information in one place.

I finished playing The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past earlier this year and it felt good to finally find everything and complete the game! I thought it would be helpful and fun to make a couple guides on where to find all of Link’s equipment and items for anyone else who may be curious and wondering where they are.

This visual or infographic guide is for Link’s “Items” as categorized on the inventory screen. After much consideration, I decided to organize the items alphabetically by their name.

I have also created another guide for Link’s “Equipment” and action or “Do” items as categorized on the inventory screen.

Please let me know if you would like me to work on a guide for the other collectibles within The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past or if there are any games you would like to see visual information or guides for in the future! I love helping people, discussing games and organizing information!

Paper Mario: The Origami King – Collectible Treasure Guides

Paper Mario: The Origami King - Red Streamer Treasure Guide

If there’s one thing I do when I play a game (besides trying to relax and enjoy myself), it’s look up information. I get curious or stuck, and I find myself turning to the internet for answers. There are a lot of good guides out there that are super helpful, but what I don’t see are an abundance of simple and clean visual guides that lay out all the information in one place.

I’ve finished playing Paper Mario: The Origami King and I loved it! All of the characters are so charming (including those previously considered villains like Kamek) and no one more so than newcomer Olivia. Olivia is such a positive, charming, lovable character in all her naivety…and just like that I’ve realized I have a real soft spot for characters that view the world with wonder.

If you want to earn 100% completion and/or score the secret ending there’s a lot of work to do! In an effort to help, I’ve created guides to help you find all 120 Collectible Treasures.

These visual or infographic guides are separated by Streamer Color and then the areas within. The Collectible Treasures are organized by their numbers, names, and a detailed description on where to find them.

Please let me know if you would like me to work on a guide for the other collectibles within Paper Mario: The Origami King or if there are any games you would like to see visual information or guides for in the future! I love helping people, discussing games and organizing information!

Paper Mario: The Origami King - Blue Streamer Treasure Guide

Paper Mario: The Origami King - Yellow Streamer Treasure Guide

Paper Mario: The Origami King - Purple Streamer Treasure Guide

Paper Mario: The Origami King - Green Streamer Treasure Guide

Wallace & Gromit’s Grand Adventures Microreview

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Wallace & Gromit’s Grand Adventures Microreview – 20/20!

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Closure Microreview

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Closure Microreview – 16/20!

Closure is a unique independent puzzle/platformer video game developed by programmer Tyler Glaiel and artist Jon Schubbe, with music and sound by Chris Rhyne, that focuses on the concept of light and dark.

Closure reveals a dark world where landscapes and objects only exist when and where the light touches. Gameplay features maneuvering light sources (fixed lamps and light orbs the player can carry) to phase objects in and out and therefore manipulate the environment for platforming. Due to real-time lighting of each level, there can be various solutions to get from point A to B by manipulating portions of platforms. Keep in mind: If it can’t be seen, it doesn’t exist. It’s possible to jump through walls and fall through floors, push boxes through walls, or drop a key through floors and walls to get to the door; just remove or add light.

The main playable character is an amorphous being who explores the stories of three human characters; a factory worker struggling to escape a decrepit factory, a young woman travelling through a murky forest to reunite body and soul after a horrific car crash, and a little girl who leaves the comfort and safety of her home to chase a black cat through an abandoned carnival. Of course, these are my interpretations, many players have speculated what the plot of this game could be. Based on the title of the game I assume each character is seeking “closure”. Although the developers may have had a specific plot in mind, I believe they have left a great deal open to your interpretation.

Each story consists of twenty four levels that can be accessed through unique doors within surreal central hubs, with ten additional levels designated to the amorphous being. The objective of the 82 levels is to travel from the start of each level to a door, some doors require keys or light sources to open. If the player reaches a dead-end in a puzzle, they can push the R key (PC) or Select button (console). There’s also an additional 30 Silver Moths to collect, where if all are found, a special unlock is rewarded. If the player reaches a dead-end in a puzzle, they can press [Select] to restart the level. A special ending is awarded to those players that also manage to collect thirty silver moths hidden throughout the game.

I really enjoy unique games that really challenge the players to think. Closure is extremely thought provoking. I loved illuminating the surroundings and devolving ways to reach the door and better still, the plot behind each character. Design and sound were also really engaging, it reminded me strongly of something born of Tim Burton’s mind.

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Sorcery! Parts 1 – 4 Microreview

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Sorcery! Parts 1 – 4 Microreview – 17/20!

Sorcery! Parts 1 through 4 is a series of text / graphic adventure video games developed for iOS, Android, Microsoft Windows and Mac by inkle.

Choosing a male or female character, the player embarks on a text-based fantasy quest inspired by Steve Jackson’s choose-your-own-adventure novels. The gameplay of Sorcery! incorporates audio and visual interactive elements; including character icons, maps, burn-by-turn energy, a spell-casting starscape and more. Much like choose-your-own-adventure novels, the player can choose to turn back the pages (or rewind the game) if they dislike the outcome of their choices along the path.

I used to love choose-your-own-adventure books (I may still own one involving a Unicorn) and I found this game to be charming, yet frustrating. Maybe it’s my obsession with getting everything exactly right, but I found myself rewinding A LOT. And because I rewound a lot, I found myself getting frustrated and bored with the story.

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The Last of Us Microreview

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The Last of Us Microreview – 20/20!

The Last of Us is an action / adventure survival horror video game developed by Naughty Dog and published by Sony Computer Entertainment.

You play as Joel, a smuggler in a now post-apocalyptic United States, as he escorts a teenage girl named Ellie across the country. Firearms and improvised weapons can be used, in stealth or a more direct approach, against hostile humans and the Infected. The Infected are once human beings who have been exposed to fungus spores that warp their minds and mutate them into cannibalistic creatures akin to zombies.

Naughty Dog is exceptional at bringing all the heart and soul into their stories. I am a total coward when it comes to survival horror games, but I had heard so many good reviews about this game’s story that I had to bold-up and experience it for myself. In terms of emotion and storytelling, this is truly one of the greatest games ever created and I cannot wait for Part II!

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Horizon Zero Dawn Microreview

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Horizon Zero Dawn Microreview – 19/20!

Horizon Zero Dawn is an action role-playing video game developed by Guerrilla Games and published by Sony Interactive Entertainment.

Set in the distant future, the humans of earth have regressed to primitive tribal societies while large robotic creatures (whose characteristics are inspired by animals and dinosaurs we are familiar with) dominate the earth. These machines peacefully coexisted with humans until a phenomenon of unknown origin turned the existing machines aggressive towards humans and larger more dangerous species to appear. Armed with a variety of ranged weapons, a spear and other stealth tactics to combat humans and mechanized creatures, the player controls a young warrior named Aloy, as she sets out to discover the truth of her origin.

I love how refreshingly unique the plot of this game is; I don’t believe I’ve played anything quite like it. The gameplay mechanics are pretty standard, with favor to the stealthy (that’s me). I reduced the game’s score by one point due to my frustration with the music that plays on the menu screens. After awhile I found myself muting the television whenever I needed to spend any amount time on the menu screens, which are used often for buying (items cannot be bought in stacks), selling, crafting, leveling up, examining the quests, the map and so on. This is only a minor grievance though when you compare it to the enjoyability of the game as a whole.

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Dear Esther Microreview

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Dear Esther Microreview – 15/20!

Dear Esther is a first-person artistic video game, developed and published by The Chinese Room.

The player explores an uninhabited Hebridean island, listening to a series of narratives addressed to a woman named Esther. These monologue fragments trigger at certain points around the island, and are chosen by the game semi-randomly. Of course this may present a problem as different playthroughs reveal slight differences in the story, with certain readings are played while others get omitted, and I personally have had no interested in replaying.

Although the narrator’s identity is not specified, evidence suggests he may be the late Esther’s husband. In his letters, the narrator refers to several other unseen characters. One is a cartographer named Donnelly, who charted the island in the past. Another character, Jakobson, was a shepherd who lived on the island in the eighteenth century. The narrator also refers to Paul, the drunk driver who caused the car accident that killed Esther. The identities of the narrator, Esther, Donnelly, Jakobson and Paul become more and more blurred as the game progresses, as the narration moves between topics and relates the characters in different ways. The random selection of voice-overs inspires ambiguity and forces the player to draw their own conclusions to the story.

The status of Dear Esther as a video game has been contested and indeed the game does not follow traditional video game conventions. The experience focuses on a story told through fragmented narrative as the player walks around an unnamed island with minimal to no interaction with the game’s environment; no choices need to be made, nor tasks to be completed.

I belive this is a video game. It’s unconventional, true, but it is a digital experience played by electronically manipulating images produced by a computer program. Mildly bizarre, but beautiful, Dear Esther is worth experiencing at least once for it’s artistic value. Therein lies the problem, because although the game has something to say, you would have to play it multiple times to catch the whole commentary and with such limited interaction with the game’s surroundings one could get bored and uninspired to play it again.

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